The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, Mackenzi Lee

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Henry “Monty” Montague was born and bred to be a gentleman, but he was never one to be tamed. The finest boarding schools in England and the constant disapproval of his father haven’t been able to curb any of his roguish passions—not for gambling halls, late nights spent with a bottle of spirits, or waking up in the arms of women or men.
But as Monty embarks on his Grand Tour of Europe, his quest for a life filled with pleasure and vice is in danger of coming to an end. Not only does his father expect him to take over the family’s estate upon his return, but Monty is also nursing an impossible crush on his best friend and travelling companion, Percy.
Still it isn’t in Monty’s nature to give up. Even with his younger sister, Felicity, in tow, he vows to make this yearlong escapade one last hedonistic hurrah and flirt with Percy from Paris to Rome. But when one of Monty’s reckless decisions turns their trip abroad into a harrowing manhunt that spans across Europe, it calls into question everything he knows, including his relationship with the boy he adores.
I rarely read historical fiction. Like. The nearest to historical I normally get is high fantasy that been based off a time period, but with dragons.Or something. But this kind of historical, I can get behind. It was ridiculous, hilarious, and fun – but at the same time, battling serious issues in a way that made your heart clench.
So Monty, our fun-loving, always drunk main character is always in a spot of bother. His Grand Tour is the kind of ‘farewell’ to this before he has to finally grow up – or that’s the plan. Instead Monty (along with best friend Percy and sister Felicity) end up with a tour that honestly, I’m surprised didn’t kill them.
After all, it featured Money running stark naked through the grounds of Versailles  (having just finished watching the series of the same name, I found this twice as funny)getting caught by highwaymen and also pirates. I vote we bring Grand Tours back into fashion – but only if they follow Monty’s own.
One of the main reasons I dislike historical is that a lot of them are written entirely in the way people used to talk. All formal and stiff and rather bland, for a book I want to read for fun. Guide isn’t like that at all – oh, it’s got style down to key, and Monty’s voice is a strong one, that when you read, you know you aren’t reading something set now, but it doesn’t get bogged down by that historical set.
Plus, like, you can’t help but related to the characters –the lines they all come out with are brilliant, witty and great. For example(and here, I post many quotes because, quite frankly, if they can’t get you to read this book, nothing will)
“Ugh. Feelings.” I take a long drink, then pass her the bottle. She has another delicate sip. “You were right—it’s less horrid now.”
“The great tragic love story of Percy and me is neither great nor truly a love story, and is tragic only for its single-sidedness. It is also not an epic monolith that has plagued me since boyhood, as might be expected. Rather, it is simply the tale of how two people can be important to each other their whole lives, and then, one morning, quite without meaning to, one of them wakes to find that importance has been magnified into a sudden and intense desire to put his tongue in the other’s mouth.
A long, slow slide, then a sudden impact.”
“Just thinking about all that blood.” I nearly shudder.”Doesn’t it make you a bit squeamish?”
“Ladies haven’t the luxury of being squeamish about blood,” she replies, and Percy and I go fantastically red in unison.”
“God bless the book people for their boundless knowledge absorbed from having words instead of friends.”
I just… you have to go and read this book. It is, by far, one of the best things I’ve ever read.
five stars
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The Seafarer’s Kiss, Julia Ember

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Having long-wondered what lives beyond the ice shelf, nineteen-year-old mermaid Ersel learns of the life she wants when she rescues and befriends Ragna, a shield-maiden stranded on the mermen’s glacier. But when Ersel’s childhood friend and suitor catches them together, he gives Ersel a choice: say goodbye to Ragna or face justice at the hands of the glacier’s brutal king.
Determined to forge a different fate, Ersel seeks help from Loki. But such deals are never as one expects, and the outcome sees her exiled from the only home and protection she’s known. To save herself from perishing in the barren, underwater wasteland and be reunited with the human she’s come to love, Ersel must try to outsmart the God of Lies.
So I am conflicted. I’ve been trying to work out what to say in this for hours now and I just… I’m so… I don’t know.
I got this because it was sold as a Little Mermaid retelling with a f/f romance in it. And yeah… I guess it is kinda that, but it’s also not one I would really want to recommend.
You know what I would have much preferred? A story just about the mermaids and how they were handling the stuff going down in their home. Because that was my favourite part of this story, and it was barely explained. There were a lot of throwaway comments within about how their king ruled in fear and they were looking at somewhere new to move to and it was never explained and I just wanted to know.
Whereas the so called romance? We saw her for like, 5 pages, then she left for most of the book, came back, there was some awkward make out/sex scenes (thankfully time skipped) and then they like punched each other AND THEN IT WAS NEVER MENTIONED AGAIN.
Like, dudes. My loves, my dears. Rule one of a healthy relationship is that you don’t hit each other. Punch each other. Whatever. Rule two is that if it happens, you get out there as quick as because if it happens once, it can happen again. I don’t care if the author trying to prove that both characters are as ‘monstrous’ as each other, you don’t fucking hit the girl you’re making out with (unless its consensual and there’s a safe word etc. Basically you don’t do it in anger.)
Like seriously one of the few f/f romances out there and it’s awful? Like, yay, we have a bi main but that doesn’t make up for it being bad rep.
They literally never talk about it (other to joke about one being able to punch better) and the ‘relationship’ then just carries on as if it’s all fine?  It’s so harmful and ughhh.
That’s all I can say on it otherwise i’ll just get even more sarcastic and annoyed, so lets move on.
As a Little Mermaid retelling, it was interesting. I loved that it twisted the story enough that you didn’t always know what was going to happen, and I love that it also mixed in Norse myths (because we always need a little Loki in our lives – even if in this  version, Loki is far more evil that prankster). The twists were great – and they showed a bit more of what the mermaid world was like, but still not enough (see what I’m getting at here, I really liked the mermaid parts and nothing else…)
Unfortunately, it wasn’t all good. Since mermaids are graded on ‘potential’ for their children, when one of the other mermaids has a low count, shes called ‘broken’. Pro tip, people; I know the point of this is that mermaids aren’t just baby making machines like they’re made out to be in this, but don’t call them broken if they can’t have kids, jesus Christ. Also don’t laugh if someone might not be able to have children but wants them. Don’t be a dick.
So all in all, yep, conflicted because I wanted to read about the world she lived in, and I think the story of that world would have been awesome – but it was all completely ruined by harmful rep and comments and everything.
two-stars

They Both Die at the End, Adam Silvera

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When Mateo receives the dreaded call from Death-Cast, informing him that today will be his last, he doesn’t know where to begin. Quiet and shy, Mateo is devastated at the thought of leaving behind his hospitalised father, and his best friend and her baby girl. But he knows that he has to make the most of this day, it’s his last chance to get out there and make an impression.
Rufus is busy beating up his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend when he gets the call. Having lost his entire family, Rufus is no stranger to Death-Cast. Not that it makes it any easier. With bridges to mend, the police searching for him and the angry new boyfriend on his tail, it’s time to run.
Isolated and scared, the boys reach out to each other, and what follows is a day of living life to the full. Though neither of them had expected that this would involve falling in love…

Some books are great. Some books are heartbreaking. Some books have you crying at work, and some books have you thinking about them all the way walking home and into the evening.

This book fits into all four categories.

We all played the game when we were younger, in the years between thinking we were immortal and realising we were not. The what would you do if you had a day left to live game, where you pretended the world was at your fingertips and the impossible became possible for twentyfour long hours. Some would say they would travel far and wide, others, that they would say goodbye, give memories back to the people they loved.

In this book, that game is reality. You get a call around midnight telling you that at some point in the next 24 hours, you’re going to die. You don’t know how, or when, but it gives you time to sort everything out, say goodbye and get ready.

Because of this knowing, things have cropped up to give you a good last day; experience centers, apps, discounts….  The app Last Friend is how the two mains meet, and is the whole reason for their day of adventures.

But the app, their friendship and day – all that actually made me think more about fate. I love how, in this book, all these side characters stories get brought together, how the random person on the street is someone important to what you are doing, how the person you might have met is the one you cross the road with later in the afternoon, and how, really, all the small decisions you make are the ones that bring you to why you die.

If Mateo hadn’t have reached out on Last Friend, he would have done various things, but then Rufus wouldn’t have met him and the day might have ended differently – but we will never know, because all those factors did bring around their deaths. Would they have died anyway – if Mateo had never left his house, would he have died sooner, or in a different way?

See, told you this book made me think. I finished it two days ago and I’m still thinking about it. (At least the tears didn’t last as long)

It’s a clever, simple idea that is pulled off effectively – you watch (read), over the whole day, as the two main characters grow and change, even when they know there is nothing to do with that change. You follow them through grieving and trying to work out how to help their friends and help each other, and even though you know how its going to end (spoiler alert, they die) you still mourn for them when it does happen.

I shouldn’t be surprised at the mourning – I’ve read one other book by Silvera and that one got me as well, so I knew already that he was a good storyteller and puller-of-the-heartstrings, but he’s improved with this book, I think. He just knows how to tell a story, and how to make the characters emotions feel just as real as your own, he pulls you up and drags you along with the characters, and with this… I know I say it a lot with character deaths, but I wish they hadn’t died, because I wanted to know what the two main characters could have become – would Mateo have gone back to hiding at home and being careful, or would he have learnt to live?

We will never know.

four stars

The Upside of Unrequited, Becky Albertalli

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Seventeen-year-old Molly Peskin-Suso knows all about unrequited love—she’s lived through it twenty-six times. She crushes hard and crushes often, but always in secret. Because no matter how many times her twin sister, Cassie, tells her to woman up, Molly can’t stomach the idea of rejection. So she’s careful. Fat girls always have to be careful.

Then a cute new girl enters Cassie’s orbit, and for the first time ever, Molly’s cynical twin is a lovesick mess. Meanwhile, Molly’s totally not dying of loneliness—except for the part where she is. Luckily, Cassie’s new girlfriend comes with a cute hipster-boy sidekick. Will is funny and flirtatious and just might be perfect crush material. Maybe more than crush material. And if Molly can win him over, she’ll get her first kiss and she’ll get her twin back.

There’s only one problem: Molly’s coworker Reid. He’s an awkward Tolkien superfan with a season pass to the Ren Faire, and there’s absolutely no way Molly could fall for him. Right?

I like this book. Just as Albertalli proved with her first book, she can write cute and write well, and write relationships well.

I think thats my favourite thing about her books. Every relationship around the main character is brilliant. A lot of YA falls down with parents – either they don’t expect, or they don’t care, or something around that idea – but in this book, not only do the parents act like parents, they have good relationships with their children. And siblings are done well too – the two mains are twins, and the book shows how both of them change as they gently grow up and both start to fall in love. They snap at each other but forgive easily and I could just see my sister and I inside them (when we were younger, at least. Now we communicate by text only!) though Cassie was not the best sister in the world.

The only downfall with this was that the main few were so well done that most others fell flat. The sister’s girlfriend fell a bit flat and Will, one of the apparently Love Interests was… well, to be honest, just an asshole. With no personality other than the ability to steal alcohol.

It was still cute though, apart from that. It’s set around the time gay marriage was legalized in America, so the story builds towards the fact that Molly’s mums decide to get married, so basically the entire book is about love and happiness and cheesiness.

I didn’t like it as much as I liked Simon but it was still a light, easy read that made me smile. Basically one of those books you would be happy to spend a summer morning reading.

Also, added bonus. Main character was explicitly fat, didn’t have to change for a happy ending and found someone who didn’t want her to change. so…

three stars