Geekerella, Ashley Poston

 30724132
Geek girl Elle Wittimer lives and breathes Starfield, the classic science-fiction series she grew up watching with her late father. So when she sees a cosplay contest for a new Starfield movie, she has to enter. The prize? An invitation to the ExcelsiCon Cosplay Ball and a meet-and-greet with the actor slated to play Federation Prince Carmindor in the reboot. With savings from her gig at the Magic Pumpkin food truck and her dad’s old costume, Elle’s determined to win – unless her stepsisters get there first.
Teen actor Darien Freeman used to live for cons – before he was famous. Now they’re nothing but autographs and awkward meet-and-greets. Playing Carmindor is all he has ever wanted, but Starfield fandom has written him off as just another dumb heartthrob. As ExcelsiCon draws near, Darien feels more and more like a fake – until he meets a girl who shows him otherwise. But when she disappears at midnight, will he ever be able to find her again?
Part-romance, part-love letter to nerd culture, and all totally adorbs, Geekerella is a fairy tale for anyone who believes in the magic of fandom.
I have two weaknesses in life (other than chocolate) and those things are fairytales, and ‘fandom’. I’m a geek for a lot of things – the above, Harry Potter, Star Trek, Star Wars, and many other books and films. So mixing both the geek culture and fairytales into one book – I was bound to pick it up in the end.
This has all the elements of Cinderella that we know and love (slightly more disneyfied than the original, but even I couldn’t see how one of the sisters would have cut off her own toes in this version) entwined with modern day life, making it an interesting and refreshing read – pretty much exactly what I wanted for my Christmas read.
The characters were brilliant- Ella herself will be relatable to so many that pick this book up; she barely has any friends in real life but lives a lot online – even the idea of randomly becoming friends with someone because they text you out of the blue is believable. A few of the people I count as my closest friends are people who I talked to online, or started geeking out about the fanfic I’ve written.
Her love of Starfield and its world is also one that will be understood; twenty years after the first Harry Potter book and it’s still going strong; with new fan theories and fanarts (writing, drawings and vlogs/musicals etc) springing up all the time. I’ve been to comicon for the last three years and it’s one of my favourite places I go every summer; for three days, you see other people and their costume design, you can cosplay as well and meet like minded people.
Her best friend Sage is also great. I’m pretty sure I want to befriend Sage (I mean who doesn’t want a friend who goes I CAN MAKE YOU THAT for a costume of a series they’ve never even watched?!) She speaks her mind, is caring and basically awesome – and I’m kinda glad that Poston made her into the ‘fairy godmother’ of the fairytale.
The only downsides to the fairytale part, I thought, were the rest of her family. I know, I know Cinders needs her evil stepmother and sisters, but they were a bit too… stereotypical, I feel, compared to the rest of the book (I mean, famous hot young actor part, also a romance stereotype but it’s different).  Like, one sister was the perfect evil bully with the quieter sister and the step mother was almost too much like the Disney version (make the breakfast, Ella, come home before 9, Ella, etc) It did make some of the scenes a bit too cheesy – but it didn’t counter how cute and fun the rest of the book was.
I love that it also followed Darien – Cinderella’s Prince Charming and the young actor taking the role of a much loved character. Everyone knows him just as the actor and from gossip sites – they all assume he’s in it for the money, rather than his own love for the show. All he wanted was to enjoy it and be himself, but he couldn’t be, not when so many people were watching him and not when his manager demanded all his time.
It tackled (gently) the whole ridiculous nothing of the ‘fake geek girls’ (yes, this happens, and my god it’s annoying) within fandom – how fandom and geek culture is not perfect.
Over all, this is a cute book and I recommend it if you’re looking for something lighthearted and fun.
 four stars
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